Zentraveler on The Chinese New Year.

Chinese zodiac water snake 2013

Chinese zodiac water snake 2013

The year 2013 will be the Water Snake with some very good predictions. Rich in wisdom and charm, you are romantic and deep thinking and your intuition guides you strongly. Avoid procrastination and your stingy attitude towards money. Keep your sense of humor about life. The Snake would be most content as a teacher, philosopher, writer, psychiatrist, and fortune-teller.

The Chinese Zodiac is based on a twelve-year cycle, each year being represented by an animal. The Water Snake is the Yin to last year’s Dragon Yang. That said, the Water Snake does not settle for mediocrity. We’re likely to see significant developments in the area of science and technology this year. Research and development are apt to flourish.

This is a Water year as well, the element most closely associated with education and research, making 2013 a very special year for scientists and scholars. Snake is a great sign, a positive one, with energy that can help us face all of the challenges ahead of us. Let’s take advantage of this vibrant influence to improve our lives — and our world! Research credits: Astrology.com

The legend of the Chinese Zodiac is: (depending on the story) These were the animals that appeared before Buddha or the Jade Emperor in response to an invitation. All the animals of the universe were summoned for a race and a banquet. The 12 animals of the zodiac all headed to the palace. The order that they came in determined the order of the zodiac.

The order is as follows: Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Ram, Monkey, Chicken, Dog, and Pig.

During the journey, however, the animals got involved in everything from high jinx to heroism. For example the rat, who won the race, only did so through guile and trickery: it jumped onto the back of the ox and won by a nose.

The snake, apparently also a little sneaky, hid on the hoof of a horse in order to cross a river. When they got to the other side, it scared the horse and beat it in the contest.

The dragon however, proved to be honorable and altruistic. By all accounts the dragon would have won the race as it could fly, but it had stopped to help villagers caught in a flooding river cross safely, or it stopped to assist the rabbit in crossing the river, or it stopped to help create rain for a drought-ridden farmland, depending on the teller.

Actual History of the Zodiac

The actual history behind the Chinese zodiac is a much less fantastical and much harder to find. It’s known from pottery artifacts that the animals of the zodiac were popular in the Tang Dynasty (618-907 A.D.), but they were also seen much earlier from artifacts from the Warring States Period (475-221 B.C.), a period of disunity in ancient Chinese history, as differing factions fought for control.

It’s been written that the animals of the zodiac were brought to China via the Silk Road, the same central Asian trade route that brought the Buddhist belief from India to China. But some scholars argue that the belief predates Buddhism and has origins in early Chinese astronomy that used the planet Jupiter as a constant, as its orbit around the earth took place every 12 years. Still others have argued that the use of animals in astrology began with nomadic tribes in ancient China who developed a calendar based on the animals they used to hunt and gather.

The scholar Christopher Cullen as written that beyond satisfying the spiritual needs of an agrarian society, the use of astronomy and astrology was also an imperative of the emperor, who had the responsibility for ensuring harmony of everything under heaven. To rule well and with prestige, one needed to be accurate in astronomical matters, Cullen wrote. Perhaps that is why the Chinese calendar, including the zodiac, became so entrenched in Chinese culture. In fact, reforming the calendar system was viewed as appropriate if political change was eminent.

Zodiac Fits With Confucianism

The belief that everyone and every animal has a role to play in society translates well with Confucian beliefs in a hierarchical society. Just as Confucian beliefs persist in Asia today alongside more modern social views, so does the use of the zodiac.

The Chinese zodiac also serves the practical purpose of figuring out a person’s age without having to ask directly and risk offending someone. Research Credits:Chineseculture.about.com

QUOTE:”Yesterday is a memory, today is a gift, tomorrow is a hope. Let’s begin New Year with faith, love, and peace. Wishing u all the best! Happy New Year! ”

THINGS YOU MAY NOT KNOW:Chinese New Year 2013 will take place on February 9 and end on February 24. During the New Year, Chinese people greet one another with unique sayings when they meet each other, whereas on ordinary days, they do not greet those people with whom they do not have a personal relationship.

THINGS YOU MAY WANT TO SAVE:Water Snakes…They are an important part of nature’s grand plan.

ZENTRAVELER SAYS: If you’re a water snake…shed your skin and transform yourself into something that is good for the world.
Watch out grasshopper…snakes love to eat grasshoppers.

From here to Infinity is a relatively short ride! The next leg takes eons and eons as you fly through the Barycentric Dynamical Time Zone! …and on and on and on.

Follow the Zentraveler Blog often for Travel, Health and Zen-like stories and such. Where else can you get a three in one blog for the price of free?

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Filed under animals of the zodiac, Chinese New Year, Chinese zodiac, water snake

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